App rationalisation – AppVolumes (Systrack)

I was recently working with a rather large finance customer who were moving to VDI (Horizon View) and even after engaging with VMware, were still none the wiser about how to rationalise and define what apps could be put on various Appstacks that would best server their users.

We came up with a dashboard that defined what apps would be in common appstacks per groups (say, office, chrome etc) and then ones that would be specific to groups (HR apps, finance apps etc). The customer could then easily see what apps were in use and how complex the app could potentially be to virtualise. This can really be used with any app layering tech, or even be manipulated for app delivery. It gave the customer visibility into their own estate, without having to involve any further 3rd parties. You’ll have to excuse the test data though! There’s plenty more on App Rationalisation and such I’ll post over time – it doesn’t really matter on the final delivery or virtualisation method as the data lets you work with any technology.

appvolumes image

VMware SDDC Certificate Tool Fling

I think most people have had issues with replacing/updating certificates on the various virtual appliances that will be floating around their infrastructure, thankfully (and finally someone has done it!), there’s a fling created to help with this! Much kudos to the creators!

Replacing SSL certificates across VMware products is a manual and time-consuming process. The SDDC Certificate Tool automates this workflow and makes it easy to keep certificates across your SDDC up to date. It will replace all certificates in the supported products and reestablish trust between the components.

Supported Products

  • VMware Platform Services Controller (PSC)
  • VMware vCenter Server (VC)
  • VMware NSX for vSphere (NSX)
  • vRealize Log Insight (vRLI)
  • vRealize Operations Manager (vROps)
  • vRealize Automation (vRA)
  • vRealize Business for Cloud (vRB)

 

SDDC Certificate Tool

Visual ESXiTop

Not everyone likes digging into the VI/Command line, or it’s not always easy to get access, or the right person to do it…Then it’s even more awkward to get that information out to somebody…

 

Not anymore – thanks to the magic and hard work put into Flings!

https://labs.vmware.com/flings/visualesxtop

VisualEsxtop is an enhanced version of resxtop and esxtop. VisualEsxtop can connect to VMware vCenter Server or ESX hosts, and display ESX server stats with a better user interface and more advanced features.

Features

  1. Live connection to ESX host or vCenter Server
  2. Flexible way of batch output
  3. Load batch output and replay them
  4. Multiple windows to display different data at the same time
  5. Line chart for selected performance counters
  6. Flexible counter selection and filtering
  7. Embedded tooltip for counter description
  8. Color coding for important counters

Windows Storage Spaces

So I decided to build server 2016 about 3 months ago on a physical machine, seeing as though my other machines were Windows 10. I had a stack of hard drives and thought I’d use it for a storage server/NAS box. Then I decided to use it as a desktop machine. To cut a long story short, as much as 2016 works pretty well as a desktop, seeing as though it’s similar to W10, there were a few reasons that made me want to move back to W10.

But… I’d put in a few drives, set up storage spaces (it’s really easy) and as I was re-installing an OS (onto a different SSD as well), I cleared down everything on the drives and moved elsewhere, stupidly deleting some stuff that I thought I’d copied off in the midst, but doing so because I couldn’t find a straight answer whether the virtual drive I’d created within Storage Spaces, would carry to another OS. Most people said no. Most people were wrong.

Rebuilt with W10, lo and behold, my drives pop up, exactly the same, sans the files I’d deleted (Dammnit!).

So, moral of the story? Shifting from W10 to/from 2016 is probably going to keep your files, but I still probably wouldn’t risk it! 😉

VMware Workstation – Failed to Lock File, cannot open disk.

So like many people, I have workstation on my laptop for test lab, with a fully functioning domain, multiple machines etc and as it’s a laptop, I shut the lid…Wander off… Get on the train, or in the car… Then it doesn’t get turned on for a few days, or is on/off/on/off etc. Workstation obviously doesn’t like this and recently I’ve been getting complaints of locked files on my VM’s, which, I don’t want to rebuild or faff with…

So voila! A solution. Simply delete (or backup, depending on your cowboy nature) the .lck files/folders of the affected VM, re-power on…and sorted! Emergency over!