VMware SDDC Certificate Tool Fling

I think most people have had issues with replacing/updating certificates on the various virtual appliances that will be floating around their infrastructure, thankfully (and finally someone has done it!), there’s a fling created to help with this! Much kudos to the creators!

Replacing SSL certificates across VMware products is a manual and time-consuming process. The SDDC Certificate Tool automates this workflow and makes it easy to keep certificates across your SDDC up to date. It will replace all certificates in the supported products and reestablish trust between the components.

Supported Products

  • VMware Platform Services Controller (PSC)
  • VMware vCenter Server (VC)
  • VMware NSX for vSphere (NSX)
  • vRealize Log Insight (vRLI)
  • vRealize Operations Manager (vROps)
  • vRealize Automation (vRA)
  • vRealize Business for Cloud (vRB)

 

SDDC Certificate Tool

Visual ESXiTop

Not everyone likes digging into the VI/Command line, or it’s not always easy to get access, or the right person to do it…Then it’s even more awkward to get that information out to somebody…

 

Not anymore – thanks to the magic and hard work put into Flings!

https://labs.vmware.com/flings/visualesxtop

VisualEsxtop is an enhanced version of resxtop and esxtop. VisualEsxtop can connect to VMware vCenter Server or ESX hosts, and display ESX server stats with a better user interface and more advanced features.

Features

  1. Live connection to ESX host or vCenter Server
  2. Flexible way of batch output
  3. Load batch output and replay them
  4. Multiple windows to display different data at the same time
  5. Line chart for selected performance counters
  6. Flexible counter selection and filtering
  7. Embedded tooltip for counter description
  8. Color coding for important counters

Windows Storage Spaces

So I decided to build server 2016 about 3 months ago on a physical machine, seeing as though my other machines were Windows 10. I had a stack of hard drives and thought I’d use it for a storage server/NAS box. Then I decided to use it as a desktop machine. To cut a long story short, as much as 2016 works pretty well as a desktop, seeing as though it’s similar to W10, there were a few reasons that made me want to move back to W10.

But… I’d put in a few drives, set up storage spaces (it’s really easy) and as I was re-installing an OS (onto a different SSD as well), I cleared down everything on the drives and moved elsewhere, stupidly deleting some stuff that I thought I’d copied off in the midst, but doing so because I couldn’t find a straight answer whether the virtual drive I’d created within Storage Spaces, would carry to another OS. Most people said no. Most people were wrong.

Rebuilt with W10, lo and behold, my drives pop up, exactly the same, sans the files I’d deleted (Dammnit!).

So, moral of the story? Shifting from W10 to/from 2016 is probably going to keep your files, but I still probably wouldn’t risk it! 😉

VMware Workstation – Failed to Lock File, cannot open disk.

So like many people, I have workstation on my laptop for test lab, with a fully functioning domain, multiple machines etc and as it’s a laptop, I shut the lid…Wander off… Get on the train, or in the car… Then it doesn’t get turned on for a few days, or is on/off/on/off etc. Workstation obviously doesn’t like this and recently I’ve been getting complaints of locked files on my VM’s, which, I don’t want to rebuild or faff with…

So voila! A solution. Simply delete (or backup, depending on your cowboy nature) the .lck files/folders of the affected VM, re-power on…and sorted! Emergency over!

IGEL and Lakeside Systrack

Obviously I’ve been in a new role at Lakeside so I’ve been living/breathing/travelling/living that, as well as more citrix environments *cough cough* – but that doesn’t really matter if I’m honest, as systrack works equally well with both. Actually, it works brilliantly with everything you can throw it at. I’m still amazed at the pain points that systrack could have fixed for me over the past 5 years and aside from new customers I’m dealing with, I’m also seeing some familiar faces from the past that I know can make use of it!

This post is to show that IGEL, as a partner, has jointly developed a solution to monitor their IGEL OS with systrack – now, as anyone in EUC who has used thin clients or a thin OS will know, they’re a little black box unless you start digging into logs, which may not actually make much sense! Now you can use the analytics to show what’s going on, in conjunction with whatever VDI solution you’re always monitoring.

I know of projects using various zero/thin clients that still complain about latency, performance issues etc and they STILL have no monitoring or any insight whatsoever and the technical skills of the people on the ground are low, to to say the least!

IGEL and Lakeside

Troubleshooting non responsive VMs

Sorry for the gap in posting…well…anything… New role has kept me very busy!

Most of us will have our own little tips and tricks on troubleshooting, but recently I had a customer who had a machine hanging, that looked suspiciously like VMware Tools was causing an issue, but they had no idea how to troubleshoot. I’d suggested various options, including simply getting the logs, checking ESXi services and so on and it wasn’t anything they’d had to do before, so I really needed something quick and fully features to suggest to them. There’s a great VMware KB which uses the process of:

Validate the scope – find out the scope of the problem and accurately define what the symptoms are (no point in just having someone screaming “It’s crashing, IT’S CRASHING!”

Identify the cause – so many possibilities! Storage, services crashing, resource contention, a task on the VM…

Action Plan – Take action to remediate the issue – once the cause has been established, focus on what is causing the issue and define a plan to resolve it.

https://kb.vmware.com/s/article/1007819